Report – Legal Compliance Workshop for NGOs 24 August 2017

FEEDBACK REPORT Legal Compliance Workshop for NGOs [Thursday, 24 th  August 2017, Lecture Room- 1, IIC (Annexe), 40 Max Mueller Marg, ...

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Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Report – Legal Compliance Workshop for NGOs 24 August 2017

FEEDBACK REPORT
Legal Compliance Workshop for NGOs
[Thursday, 24
th August 2017, Lecture Room- 1, IIC (Annexe), 40 Max Mueller Marg, N. Delhi – 3]

Dear Friends with a special Hello to all the Participants who attended the workshop, which was one of the most interactive workshop organized by SRRF so far. Credit for this goes to all the participants, who engaged the faculty and remained focused throughout the day. Through this communication we share feedback given by you.

The Feedback forms have been compiled and collated. There were 41 participants, 49% of whom have given their feedback. Feedback required scoring for each session as well as for overall workshop. The feedback gives score of 92% for the overall workshop. A chart of session-wise results is given below.

http://blog.srr-foundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/chart.pngFollowing suggestion received by participants on various topics:

Particulars

Suggestions

Please tell us how to further improve? Any specific suggestion for improvement?

–        If all topics needs to be covered the training can be for more than a day.
–        Place water bottles on the desk
SRRF Comment: While we thank you for your suggestions, however the plastic bottle is not very environment friendly and so far we have avoided it. Water is always available just outside the hall.
–        Practical example to improve the knowledge
–        More clarity from Government
–        Very well structured & it is also always a privilege to come and attend such esteemed speakers.
–        Could take fewer topics to stick to timeline.
–        Time management can be looked at
SRRF Comment: We always keep it in mind, however our effort is to solve issues raised, hence sometime discussions can be a bit longer. Our overall aim is to cover all the topics in the day itself.
–        Can take more Q & A
SRRF Comment: Effort is always to have an interactive workshop. All the questions raised during the day were taken up.

Please suggest topics for any other events that you would like SRRF to Organise.

–        A session on Sub grants to Partners
–        More on GST
–        All GST sections
–        NGO Management Systems in Place

Would you like this program to be replicated in any other state, if Yes please indicate.

Mumbai, Kerala

We have already uploaded the presentations of the workshop at our website including snaps. Please visit SRRF website to get access to the same. http://www.srr-foundation.org

We have also uploaded the snaps of the participants on SRRF facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/srr.foundation/.

Once again I thank you on behalf of SRRF, on being part of a wonderful and learning 'Legal Compliance for NGOs' workshop.

With warm regards

Ramanuj Maurya
Coordinator

PP Presentations at: http://www.srr-foundation.org/workshop/aug_17/ppt_aug17.htm

Source: http://blog.srr-foundation.org/?p=3452

Call for Expressions of Interest

Innovative Solutions Marketplace

Showcase of Innovative Solutions for Building Resilience in the Hindu Kush Himalaya

 

The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), jointly with the Ministry of Population and Environment, Government of Nepal and with support from the European Union, is hosting an international conference titled "Resilient Hindu Kush Himalaya: Developing Solutions towards a Sustainable Future for Asia" from 3 to 6 December in Kathmandu, Nepal. The conference will bring together more than 200 experts from around the globe to identify, discuss, and jointly recommend possible resilient solution packages suitable for mountain areas.

 

The conference will feature a marketplace-style innovative solutions event where participating organizations will be able to showcase ongoing or recently completed projects and innovations in the Hindu Kush Himalaya. Showcases can be made as demonstrations, displays, audio-visual exhibits, or interactive activities. Featured programme/project presentations must relate in fresh and innovative ways to building mountain resilience. Presentations must relate to at least one of the following themes:

 

  • Addressing environmental and social vulnerabilities 
  • Climate change adaptation approaches 
  • Ecosystem-based adaptation 
  • Resilient agricultural practices and sustainable food security 
  • Gender and social dynamics 
  • Market-based responses
  • Technology solutions 
  • Renewable energy
  • Water resource management 
  • Upstream-downstream linkages in relation to water sources 
  • Disaster risk reduction
  • Community-led decision making tools and instruments
  • Media and communication for sustainable mountain development
  • Waste management (recycle and reuse)

Interested organizations should use submit expressions of interest using the submission form : http://www.icimod.org/?q=28732 highlighting their programme/project achievements by 2 October 2017.

 

Preference will be given to projects/programmes that exhibit cutting-edge approaches to community innovation, gender inclusiveness, and inclusive resilience building practices. 

 

A maximum of 20 institutions/programmes/projects will be selected to exhibit their material in the marketplace. There is limited need-based funding available to support a few of the selected presenters to attend the conference. 

 

Please note the innovative solutions marketplace is open only to projects conducted in countries in the HKH—Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan. 

 

Please direct queries related to the marketplace to Bhawana.syangden@icimod.org with a copy to resilient.hkh@icimod.org.

Call for Expressions of Interest: Innovative Solutions Marketplace

Dear Friends,

 

I have included herewith a call for expression of interest for an innovative solutions marketplace. The call is also available on our website here.

 

Expressions of interest can be submitted via an online submission form highlighting programme/project achievements up to 2 October 2017.

 

Please do considering sharing this announcement in your network.

 

Best,
Utsav

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------
Call for Expressions of Interest: Innovative Solutions Marketplace

 

Showcase of Innovative Solutions for Building Resilience in the Hindu Kush Himalaya

 

The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), jointly with the Ministry of Population and Environment, Government of Nepal and with support from the European Union, is hosting an international conference titled "Resilient Hindu Kush Himalaya: Developing Solutions towards a Sustainable Future for Asia" from 3 to 6 December in Kathmandu, Nepal. The conference will bring together more than 200 experts from around the globe to identify, discuss, and jointly recommend possible resilient solution packages suitable for mountain areas.

 

The conference will feature a marketplace-style innovative solutions event where participating organizations will be able to showcase ongoing or recently completed projects and innovations in the Hindu Kush Himalaya. Showcases can be made as demonstrations, displays, audio-visual exhibits, or interactive activities. Featured programme/project presentations must relate in fresh and innovative ways to building mountain resilience. Presentations must relate to at least one of the following themes: 

 

·         Addressing environmental and social vulnerabilities

·         Climate change adaptation approaches

·         Ecosystem-based adaptation

·         Resilient agricultural practices and sustainable food security

·         Gender and social dynamics

·         Market-based responses

·         Technology solutions

·         Renewable energy

·         Water resource management

·         Upstream-downstream linkages in relation to water sources

·         Disaster risk reduction

·         Community-led decision making tools and instruments

·         Media and communication for sustainable mountain development

·         Waste management (recycle and reuse)

 

Interested organizations should use submit expressions of interest using the submission form highlighting their programme/project achievements by 2 October 2017.

 

Preference will be given to projects/programmes that exhibit cutting-edge approaches to community innovation, gender inclusiveness, and inclusive resilience building practices. 

 

A maximum of 20 institutions/programmes/projects will be selected to exhibit their material in the marketplace. There is limited need-based funding available to support a few of the selected presenters to attend the conference. 

 

Please note the innovative solutions marketplace is open only to projects conducted in countries in the HKH—Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan. 

 

Please direct queries related to the marketplace to Bhawana.syangden@icimod.org with a copy to resilient.hkh@icimod.org

New Bridgespan Study of Indian NGOs Reveals Systemic Gap Between Leadership Development Aspirations and Action

The Bridgespan Group surveyed close to 250 NGO leaders in India, and found that 97 percent recognize leadership development as vital, but many struggle with recruiting, developing, and transitioning leaders, and more than 50 percent do not believe that anyone internally could replace their senior-most leader

Mumbai, India, Sept. 05, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Mumbai6 September 2017—The Bridgespan Group, with support from the Omidyar Network, has undertaken what is believed to be the first data-driven study of NGO leadership development in India. In this report, titled, "Building the Bench at Indian NGOs: Investing to Fill the Leadership Development Gap," they identified a significant, systemic gap between the sector's leadership development aspirations and the reality of efforts and investments by both NGOs and funders.

 

According to Pritha Venkatachalam, a partner at Bridgespan and one of the report's authors, "The implications are hard-hitting, as the absence of a 'leadership bench' threatens these organizations' sustainability and long-term scalability." Bridgespan's survey included approximately 250 leaders from Indian NGOs and the Indian offices of international NGOs—supplemented with more than 50 interviews of NGO funders and intermediaries and secondary research.  

 

A full 97 percent of NGOs surveyed said that leadership development is vital to their organization's success, but more than half believe they are not capable of recruiting, developing, and transitioning leaders, nor have they received funding to do so. "The result is a trend of under-equipped NGO leadership, with high dependence on a single leader—often the founder—and no second line," said Pritha.

 

After raising concerns about this underinvestment, the Bridgespan study also charts a path to address them. Said Danielle Berfond, Bridgespan case team leader and the report's co-author, "We have seen some NGOs and funders taking the initiative to close the leadership development gap, and we believe these practices can be replicated across the sector to bolster leadership teams."

 

The path forward outlined by Bridgespan emphasizes NGOs developing leaders from within and funders providing them with the money, motivation, and required supports.

 

For NGOs, Bridgespan proposes institutionalizing a set of "Four Practices": building out a supportive culture and organization; mapping leadership development needs; providing development opportunities that emphasize on-the-job learning; and setting goals and monitoring progress.

 

"But NGOs cannot do this alone," said Ingrid Srinath, director of the Centre for Social Impact and Philanthropy (CSIP) at Ashoka University. "Funders must play a critical role in supporting NGOs and building the ecosystem for greater focus on leadership development." The study presents six specific recommendations for funders.

 

"None of this will be easy or immediate," said Pritha, "But Indian NGOs are entering an era when 'doing good' is no longer good enough. In order to increase impact, NGOs and funders need to invest today in practices that can nurture the strong leaders of tomorrow."

###

 

About The Bridgespan Group

The Bridgespan Group (www.bridgespan.org) is a global nonprofit organization that collaborates with mission-driven organizations and philanthropists to break cycles of poverty and dramatically improve the quality of life for those in need. Our services include strategy consulting, leadership development, philanthropy advising, and developing and sharing practical insights. We have offices in Boston, Mumbai, New York and San Francisco.

Attachments:

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/dba56e30-9993-4e46-94d6-af73c3382548

Liz London

The Bridgespan Group

NY: 646 562 8906  Mumbai: 91 8291 009643

Liz.London@bridgespan.org

 

Source: https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2017/09/05/1107908/0/en/New-Bridgespan-Study-of-Indian-NGOs-Reveals-Systemic-Gap-Between-Leadership-Development-Aspirations-and-Action.html

NGOs lack leaders to succeed current management: study

NGOs need to look within and groom talent to address crisis, says study

 

Indian NGOs and their leadership are more focused on building organizational abilities of future leaders rather than on individual leadership competencies. Photo: iStockphoto

Indian NGOs and their leadership are more focused on building organizational abilities of future leaders rather than on individual leadership competencies. Photo: iStockphoto

New Delhi: Leadership challenges are not restricted to the for-profit world. The social sector in India is not only grappling with recruitment and retention of leaders but also seems caught in a trap where lack of funding and irregular leadership assessment have led to over-dependence on founders.

This eventually negatively impacts plans to scale, and assessment of the true nature of social change.

Philanthropy advisory Bridgespan Group India, with support from Omidyar Network, has conducted a data-driven study: Building the Bench at Indian NGOs: Investing to fill the leadership development gap, for which it interviewed leaders from 203 Indian NGOs (non-governmental organizations), 41 international NGOs operating in India, and 50 stakeholders such as funders and capacity building organisations—to highlight how investing in leadership development can lead to better focus and results.

http://www.livemint.com/r/LiveMint/Period2/2017/09/06/Photos/Processed/w_NGO.jpg

Click here for enlarge

"We have two primary objectives for this study. The first is for NGOs to recognize that they should focus on developing leaders from within, instead of defaulting to external recruiting. The second is for funders to recognize just how deep and urgent these challenges are, and hopefully make them more accountable for implementing changes in the way they fund and support NGOs," says Pritha Venkatachalam, lead author of the study to be released on Wednesday.

In selecting the Indian NGOs, Bridgespan worked with a fixed criteria, according to which organizations had to be headquartered in an Indian city with a population of more than a million, had to be at least three years old, employ at least five full-time staff, and not be a school, hospital or religious organization.

The report shows that about 20% of Indian civil society organizations (CSO) leaders and their direct reports surveyed were not confident that there was someone else who could effectively lead the organization in case they left. Of the rest, 33% did not have an answer while 48% (approx) believed their replacement could be found. 

"Hence, less than half of Indian NGOs are confident there is someone to succeed the senior-most leaders. The reason for this lack of confidence is likely more related to the actual capabilities gap between the senior-most leaders and their next line. There is limited focus on developing senior leadership and giving them opportunities and exposure to a range of leadership roles," explains Venkatachalam.

Ingrid Srinath, director, Centre for Social Impact and Philanthropy, Ashoka University, attributes this mindset to Indian CSOs being "personality driven with the CEO/founder as the key element when it comes to raising money and setting agenda. This is a handicap when it comes to building sustainable organizations. In the event of discontinuity of service by the leader, the impact is often severe and it takes years to recoup.

A noteable example in the Indian context is what happened to Child Rights and You (CRY) after the death of Rippan Kapur in 1994.

They struggled to fill the leadership slot for almost four years while the world moved on. That kind of vacuum can be avoided." 

Manas Satpathy, executive director of the non-profit Professional Assistance For Development Action (PRADAN), says that to avoid this founder-centric focus his organization has a fixed tenure for CEO roles and leadership is rotated.

"Founder/CEOs of NGOs rarely think about transfers or retiring. This can be limiting when it comes to evolving vision and scalability. Professionals within an organization must be given a chance to steer the vision too." 

Indian NGOs and their leadership are more focused on building organizational abilities of future leaders rather than on individual leadership competencies.

Almost half of the leaders surveyed indicated that more investment was needed for building organizational abilities in the next generation of leaders while 39% indicated the least investment was needed for enhancing technical/sector-specific competencies.

Venkatachalam explains that this could be because "people in senior positions in NGOs often are good at technical aspects of the job and sector knowledge, but have fewer opportunities to learn and develop strategic thinking, decision-making, and to change the management as well as other leadership skills required to guide the organization".

The largest challenge to developing leadership skills is the lack of funding and of course a lack of regular assessment of leadership needs.

About 53% of NGO leaders say that their organization does not have the resources to allocate for leadership development programmes. About 50% of all NGOs with varying staff strengths admitted they did not formally assess their leadership needs regularly.

"The primary reason NGOs do not frequently assess leadership needs is that they do not know the value of doing so. Talent development activities can be perceived as time-consuming and/or expensive. Also, given that NGO leaders often fight multiple fires, organizational needs assessment gets de-prioritized," says Venkatachalam. 

Hence it comes as no surprise that 39% of CSOs find it difficult to recruit leaders when the need arises. After all, if an organization is not prepared to actively understand its leadership shortages, it will be difficult to either transition in-house talent to higher roles or find people from outside.

Besides, the report points out that while external hires have a high failure rate in the for-profit world, the problem is even more acute in not-for-profits.

"The person coming in from outside has a lot to learn. Many of them feel that the level of hard work in the non-profit is unexpected, and they are disappointed not to have less work pressure. Overall, NGOs are not as process-driven as companies and many who come from the outside are upset at this. Non-profits today should spend 30% of their time building processes and institutionalizing things so that they are ready for an outside leader. And anyone joining from outside the social sector has to be calm and willing to learn. Do not come in and keep referring to your previous job. You are here now, learn and deliver, and don't put the new organization down," says Bharati Chaturvedi, founder and director, Chintan Environmental Research and Action Group, a Delhi-based non-profit that works with waste management.

To deal with the funding shortage, Sathpathy and Srinath both suggest that boards and funders must be on the forefront of encouraging the incorporation of such programmes. "Leadership development is a strategic middle term goal. If funders take the onus of investing in capacity building and leadership programmes, they will help to create a stable eco-system in the social sector," says Vandana Nadig Nair, founder director of Phicus Social Solutions, which works to strengthen social sector leaders.

Aside from this, the social sector has to let go of "starvation culture. NGO leaders and funders must understand that spending money on getting good talent is not wasteful or wrong. If NGOs have to become sustainable and scale up, this mindset has to change," says Srinath. According to the report, 50% of current NGO leaders acknowledge that the biggest impediment to retaining and hiring talent is poor compensation packages.

"As founders and leaders we know that in-house leadership training is linked to scalability and sustainability because we feel the need for this the hardest. But often, we don't know how to do it. We are excellent at our work but not all of us are good at managing. We have to get a lot of foundational work done before someone wants to invest their energy in us, and of course, we often cannot pay them the amounts they would like," says Chaturvedi.

One solution that the report strongly advocates is that Indian NGOs should first look within and groom their own talent, given all of the constraints of recruiting externally. "These impediments include the costs of search (time and/or hiring external search firms), the limited talent pool which NGOs are competing over, the cost/time of on-boarding, and the unknown of whether these candidates will fit," says Venkatachalam. 

For the not-for-profit sector to play a far larger role in narrowing the social development deficit in India, prioritizing and investing in developing leaders needs to be a concerted effort from all sector stakeholders—NGO leaders, funders, and intermediaries.

Source: http://www.livemint.com/Industry/UdIacbXtoqojHsrQq4lcZM/NGOs-lack-leaders-to-succeed-current-management-study.html

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Water for Women Fund – Request for Proposals

1 September update: Added Addendum 1: All other information released on 18 August 2017 remains unchanged.


DFAT invites proposals from eligible Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) to implement gender and socially inclusive Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) projects in South Asia, South-East Asia and the Pacific through the Water for Women Fund.

The Fund is a flagship program in Australia's engagement in WASH and is part of Australia's commitment to the High Level Panel on Water. The Fund will invest $110.6 million over five years to December 2022 to improve the health, gender equality and well-being of Asian and Pacific communities through inclusive, sustainable WASH projects.

The Fund will draw on the strengths and comparative advantages of CSOs, recognised as key partners in Australia's aid program. A Fund Coordinator (subject to a parallel open tender) will support the work of CSOs and DFAT.

Proposals must be submitted online: https://waterforwomen.smartygrants.com.au/proposals

CSOs are expected to submit a separate application for each proposal. A Competitive Grant Guidelines document is available below. It includes guidance on process and eligibility. In addition to the guidelines document, the Water for Women Fund Investment Design Documentshould inform the development of proposals.

DFAT will hold one applicant briefing for interested organizations at 2.00pm, 25 August 2017 at the DFAT Victoria State Office, Level 14, 55 Collins Street, Melbourne. RSVP for attendance at this briefing is due via email to waterforwomen@dfat.gov.au by COB 23 August 2017. See Section 4.2 of the Competitive Grant Guidelines for more details.

Attachments

·         Water for Women Fund Competitive Grant Guidelines [DOCX 260 KB][PDF 997 KB]

·         Addendum 1 [PDF 65 KB] | [DOCX 33 KB]

·         Presentation – Applicant Briefing 25 August 2017 [PDF 1 MB] | [PPTX 3.1 MB]

Questions or comments

All questions or comments should be directed to waterforwomen@dfat.gov.au by 22 September 2017. DFAT will not respond to queries about the application process in any other manner.

Source: http://dfat.gov.au/about-us/business-opportunities/tenders/Pages/water-for-women-fund-request-for-proposals.aspx

Monday, September 4, 2017

Lens on US charities funding NGOs with anti-tobacco drive

NEW DELHI: Even as US-based charity Bloomberg Philanthropies is still being "watched" by the intelligence agencies for funding Indian NGOs engaged in anti-tobacco lobbying, three of its recipient NGOs have been denied renewal of registration under the Foreign Contributions Regulation Act (FCRA) or had their registration cancelled over the past year. The reason for stripping these NGOs — Voluntary Health Association of India (VHAI), Assam; VHAI, Karnataka and Institute of Public Health, Karnataka — of FCRA registration being that the Act does not allow them to receive foreign funds for activities other than their stated purpose - which includes charitable activities in the social, cultural, religious, educational or economic field.

"Lobbying is a commercial activity and should be carried out by for-profit companies under the Companies Act and should not be tax exempt as most FCRA-registered NGOs are," states the IB note on Bloomberg India's initiative under which it funds several FCRA-registered NGOs to run its three-phase campaign to target cigarettes, beedis and smokeless tobacco by lobbying for raising of pictorial health warnings on their packaging and higher taxes etc.

While IB had identified five Indian NGOs that received funds through US NGOs Campaign for Tobacoo-Free Kids and Tobacco Free Kids Action Fund, both funded by Bloomberg, two NGOs — VHAI, Delhi and VHAI, Rajasthan — were spared action under FCRA.

As per IB note on Bloomberg's anti-smoking campaign, prepared sometime in June 2016, the charity run by US billionaire Michael Bloomberg successfully lobbied for 85% pictorial warnings on cigarette packs in India, contrary to recommendations of a statutory body. The parliamentary committee on subordinate legislation, in its 22nd report tabled in the 10th Lok Sabha, had recommended a maximum 50% pictorial warning and cautioned that a higher percentage would lead to "flooding of illicit cigarettes" in the country. Also, it was argued that the 85% rule would increase the demand for smuggled foreign brands, which do not carry any pictorial warnings.

Incidentally, WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control recommends a pictorial warning of 50%. Yet, US remains a non-party to the convention, with the result that cigarette packs manufactured there do not need to carry any pictorial warnings. "Bloomberg does not run much of a campaign in US," the intelligence report is said to have underlined.

TOI sought Bloomberg's version by sending queries to its official email address on Thursday. However, there was no response despite repeated reminders.


The 85% pictorial warning rule was implemented last year as per a Supreme Courtorder. IB maintains that Bloomberg Initiative played a big role in it by using the services of lawyers, including Prashant Bhushan and Anand Grover (of Lawyers Collective run by Indira Jaising) to appear against the government of India.

The IB report states that the higher pictorial health warning on cigarette packs in India is only first phase of Bloomberg's anti-tobacco campaign in India. "It is now working on second phase, which will target production, marketing and consumption of beedis..the third phase will focus on smokeless tobacco such as gutka, khaini, etc," it says.

IB report says restrictions on tobacco use in India would encourage consumption of more injurious toxicants like alcohol and narcotics. Also, as per parliamentary committee on subordinate legislation, a crackdown on tobacco would hit farmers as 2.6 crore farmers and farm labour depend on it. Ministry of health says 0.8-0.9 crore workes depend on bidi/tendu leaf/cigarette industry.

"Foreign corporate interests making 'foreign contributions' to FCRA-registered NGOs for purposes of lobbying against an established economic activity raises multiple economic and social concerns. This includes adverse economic impact on 3.5 crore persons of the forced closure of tobacco-related farming/industry," the IB note had warned.

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/lens-on-us-charities-funding-ngos-with-anti-tobacco-drive/articleshow/60343935.cms

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